Organizational Payoffs of Accelerated Learning

 

Travelers Insurance did a side-by-side pilots, comparing conventional training methods with accelerated learning ones for teaching a new computerized system to claim adjusters. In the conventional class, 12% of the learned received test scores of 85 and above. In the A.L. group, 67% tested at 85 and above (an improvement of over 400%). And they did it in 20% less time. The secret? Stress reduction, collaboration among learners, and the use of imagery mnemonics.

A major U.S. semiconductor manufacturer improved by 507% the measurable learning in a course on safety and hazardous chemicals. The company did it by creating a learning smorgasbord in which learners could choose their own path through the curriculum from an array of options (print media, audio, video). And collaboration among learners was encouraged throughout.

Florida Community College used A.L. methods to improve computer learning by a factor of four by putting two people to a computer and making them responsible for one another's learning.

Bell Atlantic cut training time in half and improved measurable job performance when they converted their initial training of customer service reps to an A.L. format. The new training emphasized an emotionally stimulating environment, variety in training methods, total learner involvement, and collaboration among learners.

A major North American retailer using A.L. methods reduced a management class in coaching from two days to four hours by having managers help each other create their own coaching model and apply it to the job. Ninety percent of the participants reported a measurable improvement in their management skills. That never happened with the two-day non-A.L. course.

AGFA used A.L. design methods to design a one-day teambuilding course in just one hour while cutting the course delivery time from 8 1/2 hours to only 6 hours. (These designers used a curriculum development kit, The Accelerated Learning CourseBuilder, to achieve this.)